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GDPR: how to comply it and not to lose subscribers

GDPR: how to comply it and not to lose subscribers

Welcome back Multiplier! In Multiplicalia, experts in web design and e-commerce, we are affected in full with the issue that affects us today: the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). While we already discussed in another post what was coming over us in the digital landscape with these new laws, in the next lines we want to specify elements that you can not miss, with examples, when preparing to comply with this new regulation. Come on, what has been getting to the point.

The GRDP translates into awakening from the lethargy in which each individual in our database is immersed. Therefore, if you do not comply with the GDPR, the first step you must take is to create a consent campaign. Each of our subscribers must be informed that the law is changing and has to explicitly consent to the sending of future emails. With examples-illustrated, it’s always better-we tell you what this consent campaign has to accomplish.

The GDPR is the priority

Do not emboss the email or whatever you are going to use to communicate with your subscribers. The main message – and practically the only one – must be the change of laws.

An example of bad-worst- practice is The Candidate, a company dedicated to the hiring of marketing specialists, based in Manchester. In the email they send, the GDPR is relegated to the background, in a much smaller font and without any appeal. Our advice: the GDPR should be the protagonist of the email.

GRDP

Less is more

To some extent in the line of the first point, less is more is vital for the consent campaign. In this, there should be no external elements that divert the attention of the GDPR to another site.

This is the case of Destination KX, a website that reports the latest news from London. Despite using an original and striking title, their campaign is not finished. By offering to enter the draw for two tickets to an event, the user may forget the GDPR and click on the button. Quite simply, the fact that this button implies your consent to receive future emails is relegated to the background. Therefore, do not forget: the campaign must be, above all, to request consent.

 

GDPR

 

Clarity first of all

Keep in mind, always, that with the campaign you are asking the client for permission to remain in the database. Based on this, be clear. Do not use strange words or technical language. And of course, leave aside the writer you carry inside and do not put flourishes to the text.

The campaign of Nucco Brain, a company based in London dedicated to marketing campaigns, is an example. The issue when sending this email (it does not appear in the image) was: “The GRDP is coming and we still want to offer you a cup of tea”. Even at the end, they ask: “Would you like to continue taking our cup of tea?”. The message is, at least, insipid and very diffuse. A clear, concise and strong language is your best ally to not lose subscribers.

 

GDPR

A case of outstanding? ASOS

Having seen what you DO NOT have to do, we move on to what you DO have to do. ASOS, the global king of fashion online, has developed a consent campaign that is simply perfect. A clear and concise matter – “The law is changing, are you ready to receive your emails from ASOS?” – invite to open the message. And once inside, there is no mistake.

 

GDPR

“The law is changing” in the form of a GIF; a phrase in motion that draws the attention of the reader and establishes what the message is about. “Only get the emails you want from us”, it is clearly a “you have control”. In case it was not clear, it specifies: the user controls what comes to his tray. It also adds a button with a simple and strong call to action: “Opt me in”. And if that were not enough, this campaign communicates on which topics will be informed and gives the option to choose preferences.

 

GDPR

Finally, a footnote that can not miss: three calls to action that allow you to continue or stop receiving emails and change preferences.

With all the above, there is little to say. But, one last tip: if you want to comply with the GDPR, you know, follow the example of ASOS. And if you want to enjoy a web design and a category SEO positioning, Multiplicalia! Contact us, we are waiting for you. Until the next blog, Multiplier!

 

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